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Beauty & Cosmetics

The US Humane Cosmetics Act Gets New Support from Politicians & #BeCrueltyFree!

The US Humane Cosmetics Act Gets New Support from Politicians & #BeCrueltyFree!


In March of 2014,bill H.R. 4148, the Humane Cosmetics Act was proposed in the United States. This act was proposed towards the end of the government year and was unable to gain the leverage and support it needed to move forward in 2014. Now, over a year later, the Humane Cosmetics Act has received a reboot with new political support and organization support. Hopefully, this is what is needed to move the Humane Cosmetics Act foward and make changes to the animal testing laws in the United States!

Here’s what you need to know about the Humane Cosmetics Act:

  • The Humane Cosmetics Act was originally introduced by U.S. Representative Jim Moran, D-West Virginia. This legislation is now sponsored by U.S. Reps. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., Don Beyer, D-Va., Joe Heck, R-Nev., and Tony Cárdenas, D-Calif.
  • If passed, the Humane Cosmetics Act, would end animal testing for cosmetics after a one-year phase.
  • If passed, the Humane Cosmetics Act, would phase out the sale of cosmetics that have been tested on animals in three years.
  • If passed, the Humane Cosmetics Act, would make it illegal for anyone to conduct or commission cosmetic animal testing in the U.S.
  • If passed, the Humane Cosmetics Act, would prohibit selling, offering for sale or transporting any cosmetics in interstate commerce if the final product or any component was developed or manufactured using animal testing.
  • The Humane Cosmetics Act, like other Acts and bans around the world, would only regulate companies in the United States and would not impact them in international markets. Brands sold in the US could still sell in markets, such as China, where post-market animal testing is required by law.

Seeing the Humane Cosmetics Act be revived is amazing!! I personally was shocked at how long it was stagnant and am thrilled to see politicians in both political parties and groups like Humane Society International getting involved. Animal testing is unnecessary and outdated. Changes need to happen in the US to work towards a ban on animal testing.

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Beauty & Cosmetics, Hair Care, Lifestyle, Nail Care, Product Reviews, Recipes, Skin Care

South Korea Animal Testing Ban News May Have Been Premature

South Korea Animal Testing Ban News May Have Been Premature

Last week the cruelty free blogging world was buzzing about a potential ban on animal testing in South Korea. What many blogs were posting was that animal testing on finished products was going to be banned. I did a lot of digging and could not find conclusive documentation to show that this was the case. In fact, very few reputable organizations were reporting that South Korea had changed their animal testing stance, much less implemented a ban on animal testing.

At the same time that I was digging, Humane Society International (HSI) reached out to me with an update from their end. HSI has always been very research driven and detail oriented. When it comes to organizations, I honestly can say that I trust their research about animal testing policies and changes more than that of any other organization.

What is important to know is that a five year plan has been proposed that, if passed, would potentially phase out animal testing for finished cosmetic products. This is part of one of several five year plans that have been proposed. There is no guarantee that this specific five year plan would be implemented. These proposed five year plans are now being reviewed by several departments before they would then potentially move forward with one. At this time, none of the proposed five year plans have been enacted and neither has a South Korea animal testing ban of any sort. 

What is also important to note is that, in South Korea, most of the animal testing occurs on ingredients and not finished products. The large majority of brands there have already phased out animal testing on finished cosmetic products. A real impact would be made if a ban on animal testing on ingredients was put into place.

Continue reading to find out more about the South Korean animal testing ban – what changes have been proposed and what they would impact.

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Beauty & Cosmetics

Phoebe Dykstra supports the #BeCrueltyFree Campaign!

Phoebe Dykstra supports the #BeCrueltyFree Campaign!

TV’s Phoebe Dykstra Asks Politicians to Have a Heart for Animals, Ban Cosmetics Animal Testing

Star supports #BeCrueltyFree Canada campaign for World Animal Day

MONTREAL (01 Oct. 2014)—Phoebe Dykstra, social media personality and former MTV Canada host, has chosen the week of World Animal Day (Oct. 4) to urge Canada to ban cruel animal testing for cosmetics. Rabbits are commonly used in cosmetics tests during which they can have chemicals dripped in their eyes and spread on their delicate skin. Such testing is cruel and unnecessary, says Phoebe, who is giving her support to the #BeCrueltyFree Canada campaign, a partnership between Humane Society International and Animal Alliance of Canada.

To demonstrate her support, Phoebe took to Twitter and Instagram, posting a photo of herself wearing a #BeCrueltyFree t-shirt and bunny ears. She Tweeted “Canada! Be beautiful without hurting bunnies! Ban cosmetics animal testing #BeCrueltyFree”.

Phoebe said: “I’m a proud Canadian, but I’m not proud that it’s still legal in Canada to test on bunnies and other gentle creatures for cosmetics. Causing animals pain for the sake of a lip-liner or an eye-shadow can never be justified. And that’s why so many other countries around the world have banned the practice. I want Canada to be one of them, I want Canada to #BeCrueltyFree!”  

Thanks in large part to #BeCrueltyFree campaigning, animal testing for cosmetics is already banned across the European Union, Norway, Israel and India, and legislative bans have also been proposed in Australia, Brazil, New Zealand, Taiwan and the United States. But the practice remains legal in around 80 per cent of countries globally, including Canada.

Aviva Vetter, HSI’s #BeCrueltyFree Canada campaigner, said: “We’re thrilled to have Phoebe’s support for an end to cosmetics cruelty in Canada. She’s the perfect #BeCrueltyFree advocate – she loves make-up but not at the expense of animals. It’s so sad to think that in laboratories around the world and right here in Canada, animals can still suffer for our beauty despite the fact that it’s so easy to produce cosmetics without animal testing. So this World Animal Day #BeCrueltyFree is asking Canada’s politicians to have a heart for animals and ban cosmetics cruelty.”

Rabbits, guinea pigs, rats and mice all endure untold suffering for the beauty industry. Developed in the 1940s, skin and eye irritation tests involve holding rabbits in full body restraints so that chemicals can be applied to their eyes and skin. These tests are notoriously unreliable as well as extremely cruel, causing eye reddening, swelling, ulceration, even blindness, skin cracking and bleeding. Unlike humans, rabbits have no tear ducts so they can’t cry out the harmful substances.

Phoebe joins other celebrities including Ricky Gervais, Jenna Dewan Tatum and Leona Lewis who have spoken out against cosmetic animal testing on behalf of #BeCrueltyFree.

Say “no” to cruel cosmetics in Canada by signing the #BeCrueltyFree pledge here.

Be Cruelty-Free Canada is a partnership between Humane Society International/Canada and Animal Alliance of Canada, and is part of the largest campaign in the world to end cosmetics animal testing. Globally, #BeCrueltyFree is driving policy change across Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, India, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Russia, Taiwan and in the U.S. where the campaign is spearheaded by The Humane Society of the United States – on the Web at hsi.org/becrueltyfree.

Phoebe Dykstra supports the #BeCrueltyFree Campaign!

A note from Tashina of Logical Harmony – I was SO excited when Phoebe posted this on Instagram. I thought it was amazing that she was sharing her support for the #BeCrueltyFree campaign. As you may or may not remember, I was a part of a video campaign when this first launched. I was even more excited about this when I saw a comment Phoebe made on her Instagram photo! Thank you for supporting #BeCrueltyFree AND Logical Harmony, Phoebe!

Beauty & Cosmetics, Hair Care, Lifestyle, Nail Care, Product Reviews, Recipes, Skin Care

Logical Harmony in the Humane Society International #BeCrueltyFree Video Campaign!

Logical Harmony in the Humane Society International #BeCrueltyFree Video Campaign!

I have some exciting news to share with you! I was featured in the Humane Society International’s #BeCrueltyFree week campaign! This video is specifically about the importance of supporting brands who do not test on animals and bringing awareness to the issue of animal testing. I’m so excited to have been a part of this campaign and to be featured with such great company!

Beauty Bloggers Unite for Be Cruelty-Free Video Appeal to End Cosmetics Animal Testing   

LONDON (12 March 2014) – Some of the most popular and influential cruelty-free beauty bloggers on the web have come together to create a unique and fun video in support of the global Be Cruelty-Free campaign, the largest campaign in the world to end cosmetics animal testing.

Globally Be Cruelty-Free is run by Humane Society International, with Be Cruelty-Free USA co-ordinated by the Humane Society of the United States and the Humane Society Legislative Fund.

Launched during Be Cruelty-Free Week, the video addresses a serious subject in a fun way and stars bloggers Jen Mathews (My Beauty Bunny), Lex Croucher (LexCanRoar), Tashina Combs (Logical Harmony), Courtney Nawara  (Phyrra), Sunny Subramanian (Vegan Beauty Review) and Nika Jabiyeva and Nina Nadazdin   (Pirouette Professional). These beauty experts love make-up but hate animal suffering, and have thousands of dedicated online followers who share their passion.

Jen Mathews from U.S.-based My Beauty Bunny said: “I am so excited to be a part of the Be Cruelty-Free video. It was an honour to work alongside such talented fellow beauty vloggers and I really hope that it goes viral and helps gets the word out that animal testing of cosmetics needs to stop!”

Claire Mansfield, HSI’s Be Cruelty-Free campaigns director, said: “Social media plays a huge role in communicating ideas around the world, and in the blogosphere our video stars are some of the most influential voices on the subject of beauty without cruelty. We are thrilled to launch our new video and harness the power of the blog to help us end the suffering of animals in the global cosmetics industry.”

Last week, The HSUS was delighted to welcome the introduction of a landmark bill by U.S. Representative Jim Moran to end cosmetics animal testing in the United States. The aptly named Humane Cosmetics Act follows extensive campaigning by The HSUS and HSLF. The legislation seeks to end both cosmetics animal testing and the sale of newly animal-tested cosmetics, replicating the end to testing and sales that HSI’s Be Cruelty-Free campaign helped to achieve in the European Union.

Be Cruelty-Free drives change worldwide, having already achieved a national cosmetics animal testing ban in India, welcomed a state-wide testing ban in Sao Paulo as part of its Be Cruelty-Free Brazil campaign, and played an instrumental role in seeing China revise its cosmetics regulations for the first time in more than 20 years. Globally HSI runs Be Cruelty-Free campaigns across Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, India, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Russia and Taiwan.

Watch and share the Be Cruelty-Free video here.

Beauty & Cosmetics, Hair Care, Lifestyle, Nail Care, Product Reviews, Recipes, Skin Care

Be Cruelty-Free Campaign to End Cosmetics Animal Testing in China Launches with Pop Singer Wang Feifei

Be Cruelty-Free Campaign to End Cosmetics Animal Testing in China Launches with Pop Singer Wang Feifei

The animal testing policies in China are one of the most controversial. Currently, all cosmetics sold in China are required to be tested on animals. Many brands that would otherwise be cruelty free submit to these tests in order to have access to the Chinese consumers. In a recent press release from Humane Society International, they provided a lot of great details about the Be Cruelty-Free campaign they are launching in China.

BEIJING (July 1, 2013)Be Cruelty-Free, the world’s largest campaign to end animal testing for cosmetics globally, has launched in China to promote beauty without animal suffering.  Humane Society International, Chinese NGOs and academic scientists, global retailer LUSH Cosmetics and Chinese pop singer Wang Feifei, are calling for China to end its mandatory testing of cosmetics on live animals. Be Cruelty-Free is already driving policy change across India, South Korea, Oceania, Brazil, Russia, Canada and beyond.

China is the world’s fourth largest beauty market, worth an estimated $22 billion globally, and also one of few countries where cosmetics animal testing is still legally required. Beauty brands including LUSH and Urban Decay decline to sell in mainland China until the animal test requirements are removed, but most other market-leading cosmetics companies do sell in China, meaning they submit to animal testing.

Be Cruelty-Free’s aspirations were given a boost this month when European Union Commissioner Tonio Borg discussed animal testing with Chinese regulatory authorities, encouraging them in a subsequent statement “to avoid unnecessary testing for cosmetics,” and adding that in certain cases “the respect of animals as well as the costs of animal tests speak in favour of not doing them.”

Worldwide, hundreds of cosmetics companies avoid new animal testing by using safe, existing ingredients and available non-animal tests. However, most internationally recognized non-animal tests have not yet been officially accepted by Chinese regulators, although this is beginning to change. HSI is doing its part to support accelerated uptake of alternative testing methods by China through the launch of an $80,000 partnership with the Institute for In Vitro Sciences to provide Chinese scientists with hands-on training using advanced non-animal methods.

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